Bullock exhibit showcases food production, cooking from around the world

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The Bullock Texas State History Museum is hosting a new food exhibit called “Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture” that will be on display through July 24. The exhibit includes artifacts, dioramas, an interactive virtual cooking table, smell stations and a test kitchen that on select days will have programming curated by their partners at Whole Foods Market. Photo by Addie Broyles.
This is one of the dioramas at the new global food exhibit at the Bullock Texas State History Museum. Photo by Addie Broyles.

This is one of the dioramas at the new global food exhibit at the Bullock Texas State History Museum. Photo by Addie Broyles.

Food is rarely celebrated at museums beyond the cafe you might visit when you’re finished looking at the art. But at the Bullock Texas State History Museum, a new exhibit called “Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture” puts food at the forefront.

Through July 24, the 7,000-square-foot exhibit hall on the ground floor of the museum will showcase a traveling food exhibit that originated at the American Museum of Natural History in New York in 2012.

The Bullock Texas State History Museum is hosting a new food exhibit called “Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture” that will be on display through July 24. The exhibit includes artifacts, dioramas, an interactive virtual cooking table, smell stations and a test kitchen that on select days will have programming curated by their partners at Whole Foods Market. Photo by Addie Broyles.

The Bullock Texas State History Museum is hosting a new food exhibit called “Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture” that will be on display through July 24. The exhibit includes artifacts, dioramas, an interactive virtual cooking table, smell stations and a test kitchen that on select days will have programming curated by their partners at Whole Foods Market. Photo by Addie Broyles.

“Texas history is U.S. history is world history,” says Kate Betz, associate director of education for the museum. For instance, by learning about what a pre-Columbian Aztec market looks like or what a Chinese emperor might have had for breakfast, we can understand how global cuisine has evolved over time and what clues to a food’s past can be found in its present form, even at grocery stores and restaurants in Central Texas.

The exhibit covers lots of newsworthy aspects of food, including agriculture practices, food waste and population growth, but also the science of flavors and a celebration of cookbooks, cooking implements and tools from all over the world.

The exhibit includes artifacts, dioramas, an interactive “virtual cooking” table, smell stations and a test kitchen that on select days will have programming curated by their partners at Whole Foods Market. You can get a glimpse of the exhibit through the hashtag, #CelebrateFoodTX, where the museum is also encouraging visitors to share their own photos and memories around food.

Admission for adults is $12 and $8 for children ages 4 to 17. You can find out more at thestoryoftexas.com.

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