5 Days of Scandinavia: No-Bake Chocolate Oat Balls, perfect for fika

These chocolate oat balls are among the many treats that Swedes eat during fika, a coffee break in the middle of the day. Photo by Addie Broyles.

These chocolate oat balls are among the many treats that Swedes eat during fika, a coffee break in the middle of the day. Photo by Addie Broyles.

I’m wrapping my up post-vacation stories about Sweden and Denmark, two countries I visited earlier this month and have been dreaming about ever since.

On Wednesday, you can read my column that digs a little deeper into the purpose of my visit, what I ate and some recipes to bring some of those tastes back home, but first, I wanted to share one of the dishes in that story that I made over the weekend.

We saw these chocolate balls, called chokladbollar, in every cafe and market in Sweden. They are a perfect example of something you’d eat at fika, the coffee-and-a-snack bread that many Swedes take every day.

These balls are a simple mixture of butter, sugar, cocoa and finely ground oats, rolled in a ball and coated with coconut. They remind me a little of those no bake cookies we used to make at kids, but these aren’t even heated on the stove. (And no peanut butter. But a scoop of that would be an excellent addition to the ingredient list, however inauthentic.)

Chocolate Oat Balls

2 cups rolled oats
1/2 cup unsalted butter, room temperature
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1 tsp. pure vanilla
1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 cup finely shredded coconut

In a food processor, pulse the oats into coarse meal. Don’t grind too finely. If you don’t have a food processor, use quick cooking oats or the finest oats you can find.

In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar. Add the cocoa powder and vanilla and continue to cream until well blended. Using your hands, mix in the oats and salt.

Place the shredded coconut on a small plate. Roll about a tablespoon of the mixture into a ball and then roll the ball in the coconut until fully coated. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator or in the freezer.

— From “Fika: The Art of The Swedish Coffee Break, with Recipes for Pastries, Breads, and Other Treats” by Anna Brones and Johanna Kindvall (Ten Speed Press, $17.99)


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