Longtime Satay owner Foo Swasdee launches line of Thai cooking sauces

After Foo Swasdee closed her nearly 30-year-old pioneering restaurant, Satay, last summer, she knew she wasn’t leaving the food business altogether.

Foo Swasdee is the owner of Satay, a Thai restaurant that has been in business since 1987. (Laura Skelding AMERICAN-STATESMAN)

Foo Swasdee opened Satay in 1987. Laura Skelding /AMERICAN-STATESMAN

The culinary concept taking over the former physical location of Satay is called Sumptuary, where chefs can try out new concepts or host pop-up dinners in the rented space.

That space won’t open until later this year, but over the holidays, Swasdee and Fischer & Wieser Specialty Foods announced that they had partnered to create Dr. Foo’s Kitchen, a new line of Thai cooking sauces that is now for sale.

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Pad Thai sauce is one of five Dr. Foo’s Kitchen sauces you can buy online and in Central Market. Contributed by Fischer & Wieser.

The Fredericksburg-based Fischer & Wieser produces more than 150 sauces, jams and jellies under its own brand, and the five new Dr. Foo sauces — Thai Sweet Garlic and Ginger, Tamarind Pad Thai Stir-Fry, Thai Peanut Coconut, Bali BBQ and Thai Red Curry — aim to help home cooks recreate the flavors they might have only had in a restaurant like Satay.

You can use them for dipping and stir-frying or in a sauce for vegetables, meat or seafood. They cost $7.99 each and are available at Central Market (and Tom Thumb’s and Alberton’s stores elsewhere in the state), online and in the Fredericksburg store.

Also of note for Fischer & Wieser: Last year, they opened a new cooking school at their popular Das Peach Haus tasting showroom and store in Fredericksburg. The classes last about two hours eats and cover a wide variety of subjects. You can find the schedule and sign up for one at jelly.com.

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This pad Thai recipe is from Foo Swasdee, who opened one of Austin’s first Thai restaurants in 1987. She closed it in 2016 but is now selling some of her sauces through a partnership with Fischer & Wieser. Contributed by Fischer & Wieser.

Dr. Foo’s Pad Thai

4 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra if needed
1 cup sliced pork
1 cup medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
2 tsp. chopped garlic
1/2 lb. medium-size dried rice noodles (soaked 60 minutes in cold water and drained)
1 cup Dr. Foo’s Kitchen Tamarind Pad Thai Stir-Fry Sauce
1 to 2 Tbsp. Thai fish sauce (optional)
4 large eggs
1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper
2 Tbsp. chopped peanuts
3/4 cup sliced green onion
3 cups bean sprouts, rinsed, plus more for garnish
1 cup chopped cilantro
1 large lime

Heat the oil in a wok. Add the pork and shrimp and keep stirring until the shrimp changes color. Add the garlic and stir-fry for 1 minute. Remove the mixture to prevent overcooking. Add the noodles. They will stick together so stir fast and try to separate them. Add a little water, stirring a few times. Then add the Pad Thai sauce and fish sauce (if using), and keep stirring until everything is thoroughly mixed. The noodles should appear soft and moist. Return the cooked shrimp mixture to the wok.

Push the contents of the wok up around the sides to make room to fry the eggs. If the pan is very dry, add 1 more tablespoon of oil. Add the eggs and spread the noodles over the eggs to cover. When the eggs are cooked, stir the noodles until everything is well mixed, resulting in cooked bits of egg, both whites and yolk, throughout the noodle mixture. Add crushed red pepper, peanuts, green onions and bean sprouts. Mix well. Remove to a platter. Garnish with cilantro, squeeze lime juice over the top and serve. Serves 4

— Foo Swasdee


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